Discussion:
Things to remember in very hot weather
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Mxsmanic
2008-06-29 00:56:14 UTC
Permalink
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
Bertie the Bunyip
2008-06-29 01:09:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
Extra fans for your computer



Bertie
j***@specsol.spam.sux.com
2008-06-29 01:15:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43? C)?
Turn on the air conditioner in your hovel.
--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
terry
2008-06-29 01:28:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
Dehydration is the main one, I take a six pack for every planned
flight hour, including reserves, and just a can for taxi allowance
either end. And dont forget to include them in your weight and
balance.
Terry
PPL Downunder
F***@gmail.com
2008-06-29 02:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
The negative effects of high density altitude.
terry
2008-06-29 06:14:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by F***@gmail.com
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
The negative effects of high density altitude.
we have tried to explain the density altitude concept to him before.
it ended up in a debate about the gas laws, and how ( according to
mxs) they dont apply to the atmosphere. believe me its a lost cause
trying to explain anything to him.
Nomen Nescio
2008-06-29 02:30:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
With all the hour you claim to have flown, and with all your flights between PHX and LAS, why do you have to ask? Were you lying about all those flights all this time?
terry
2008-06-29 06:21:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
Not being a simmer myself, but dont you guys look at performance
charts and weather reports and make pretend flight plans and all that
sort of stuff that real pilots do? or do you just jump on the computer
and take off?
Mxsmanic
2008-06-29 10:30:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by terry
Not being a simmer myself, but dont you guys look at performance
charts and weather reports and make pretend flight plans and all that
sort of stuff that real pilots do? or do you just jump on the computer
and take off?
It depends on the simmer. Some go to extremes with details, others do not.
In simulation, you can simulate the part you enjoy, and skip the part you
don't, which is one of its key advantages.

At least in the case of online flight, flight plans are routinely filed (and
of course they are required for IFR). I look briefly at weather for the
departure and destination airports and sometimes at weather along the way; I
do a lot of flying in the American southwest, where the weather tends to be
perpetually VMC, so detailed analysis isn't usually required. If I'm flying
through Alaska or through the Midwest in winter, or any place where VMC is not
the rule, or any place unfamiliar, I look more closely.

I only look at performance charts in unusual situations (such as this one). I
fly the same aircraft regularly and in normal situations I have a good idea
what performance to expect. Yesterday I noted the temperature on the ramp to
be 42.9° C, and so I worried a bit about any potential problems that I might
have forgotten about that are associated with high ambient temperatures, which
is why I asked about it.

There are simmers who have simulated passenger and cargo manifests, virtual
airlines for which they fly, and other simulated details highly peripheral to
the flight itself, but I don't usually bother with those, although I try to
come up with weak pretexts for having different numbers of passengers aboard
in small aircraft. In large aircraft I generally assume that I'm flying a
private jet with a fairly fixed weight and a constant fuel load so that I
don't have to constantly recalculate things. I keep more than enough fuel
aboard in both cases to cover the time range that interests me (no more than
two hours or so for a flight, and often much less).

There are also simmers who are very close to gamers, in that they'll just jump
into the aircraft and take off, and buzz buildings and fly loops and all sorts
of tremendously unrealistic things. They are only a problem if they do this
online, as online flight (at least on VATSIM) is supposed to be just like real
life, and this means no Mach 2.5 passes over the runways at LAX or anything
like that.

In simulation there is also a type of pilot that one would never see in real
life, namely, a pilot who has flown only airliners and only with full
automation. These pilots have learned only how to load something into their
FMC, and depend on the computer to handle the flight; they maneuver by
adjusting controls on the autopilot, and every landing is an autoland. They
aren't much of a hindrance if all goes well, but since they are often
incapable of flying the aircraft without the FMC, any instruction from ATC
that requires manual intervention leaves them dangerously confused. I'm not
sure what sort of person would only be interested in loading the FMC and
going, without ever being curious about the other aspects of piloting, but
they seem to be common. Perhaps it's the ATC that attracts them, and they
just want to sound cool on the radio.
terry
2008-06-29 11:08:58 UTC
Permalink
Not being a simmer myself,  but dont you guys look at performance
charts and weather reports and make pretend flight plans and all that
sort of stuff that real pilots do? or do you just jump on the computer
and take off?
I only look at performance charts in unusual situations (such as this one).  I
fly the same aircraft regularly and in normal situations I have a good idea
what performance to expect.  Yesterday I noted the temperature on the ramp to
be 42.9° C, and so I worried a bit about any potential problems that I might
have forgotten about that are associated with high ambient temperatures, which
is why I asked about it.
Why do you worry? Worrying to me implies some sort of sonsequences if
you screw up. Can you please elaborate on the consequences you are
worried about, I am really intrigued.
Terry
Mxsmanic
2008-06-29 12:53:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by terry
Why do you worry? Worrying to me implies some sort of sonsequences if
you screw up. Can you please elaborate on the consequences you are
worried about, I am really intrigued.
I might have an accident.
More_Flaps
2008-06-29 09:58:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
What are the main things I have to give special consideration to when
preparing to fly in very hot weather (43° C)?
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
Next?

Cheers
Mxsmanic
2008-06-29 10:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about flying at
43° C in real life.
Stealth Pilot
2008-06-29 13:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about flying at
43° C in real life.
on the contrary it is a hell of a lot of fun.
just how long do you think it stays 43 C when you are flying for real?

Stealth Pilot
terry
2008-06-29 13:40:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stealth Pilot
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately).  That's
another advantage of simulation.  There would be nothing fun about flying at
43° C in real life.
on the contrary it is a hell of a lot of fun.
just how long do you think it stays 43 C when you are flying for real?
everyone knows that Stealth , as you get closer to the sun it gets
hotter, thats why that Icarus dude got his wings melted, and its why I
fly a high wing.. just for the shade factor.
Terry
muff528
2008-06-29 13:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mxsmanic
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about flying at
43° C in real life.
I doubt it would be uncomfortably hot at 3-4000 feet if it's 43° C on the
ground. Maybe you're flying too close to the ground.

Tony P.
Lou
2008-06-29 13:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by muff528
Post by Mxsmanic
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about flying at
43° C in real life.
I doubt it would be uncomfortably hot at 3-4000 feet if it's 43° C on the
ground. Maybe you're flying too close to the ground.
Tony P.
I'll disagree, 43° C (109 f.) is extremely uncomfortable at 3000'.
Unless you have A/C in the plane, I don't.
Lou
muff528
2008-06-29 13:57:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by muff528
Post by Mxsmanic
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about
flying
at
43° C in real life.
I doubt it would be uncomfortably hot at 3-4000 feet if it's 43° C on the
ground. Maybe you're flying too close to the ground.
Tony P.
I'll disagree, 43° C (109 f.) is extremely uncomfortable at 3000'.
Unless you have A/C in the plane, I don't.
Lou

Yep, 43° C (109 f.) WOULD be extremely uncomfortable at 3000'. But it
probably not that hot at 3000 if it's 43C on the ground.

TP
Lou
2008-06-29 14:02:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lou
Post by muff528
Post by Mxsmanic
Post by More_Flaps
Sweat dripping onto your keyboard and BO attracting the landlord.
The hot weather was in the sim, not in real life (fortunately). That's
another advantage of simulation. There would be nothing fun about
flying
at
43° C in real life.
I doubt it would be uncomfortably hot at 3-4000 feet if it's 43° C on the
ground. Maybe you're flying too close to the ground.
Tony P.
I'll disagree, 43° C (109 f.) is extremely uncomfortable at 3000'.
Unless you have A/C in the plane, I don't.
Lou
Yep, 43° C (109 f.) WOULD be extremely uncomfortable at 3000'. But it
probably not that hot at 3000 if it's 43C on the ground.
TP
I'll be honest, I won't fly (C152) in that hot of weather. Solo, I can
get
off the ground, but I can't grasp the controls. My palms sweat like a
fountain.
Lou
B A R R Y
2008-06-29 14:12:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by muff528
Yep, 43° C (109 f.) WOULD be extremely uncomfortable at 3000'. But it
probably not that hot at 3000 if it's 43C on the ground.
Do you fly?

109F on the ground would be at or near 100F at 3,000. That's still hot,
especially with the sun beating on you through the windows.

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